New Arrival: A Little Felt Spider

Little Felt Spider - Muumade's sewing pattern & tutorial

The Little Felt Spider just joined the Muumade clan!  Its sewing pattern & tutorial is now available from my online shop, Muumade.etsy.com.

Please also visit my blog page for more hauntingly cute images of the Little Felt Spider, as well as some curiosities about these creepy and yet beautiful crawlers.

There is still time for this perfect sewing project to create a one-of-a-kind Halloween accessory or decoration.  So hurry before your chance scurries away like a spider!

How to Add a Lining to a Leotard or Swimsuit

How to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit

 

Sometimes leotards and swimsuits are so thin that you wish they had a lining.  So, here is how you can hand-sew a layer of lining into garments made of stretchy fabric, such as spandex (also known as elastane or Lycra). 

(Note:  Please click on the photos to enlarge them for a close-up view of their detail.)

How to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit 1. As shown in the photo, prepare a sheet of spandex that is a bit larger than the section of the leotard or swimsuit you wish to line.  It is important that the section be bordered by existing machine-made stitching as you will sew through those seams to hide your new stitches.  (In the photos I will show the process of adding a lining to the entire front section of a leotard.)

Turn the garment inside out and place it on top of the fabric, with the section of the garment you wish to line against the fabric.  Center the section to line on the lining fabric.

 How to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit

 

2.  Carefully turn over both items (at the same time) so that the fabric lining is on top.

Flatten the fabric against the garment, and carefully pin the fabric along the outline of the section you wish to line.  (Do not stretch the fabric; just straighten it so it does not get twisted.)

 How to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuitHow to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit 3.  Before you begin to sew, please note the following:  

  • Use regular polyester sewing thread for the sewing (in a color which matches the thread of the garment’s seams).

 

  • Do not cut out the lining yet, but sew over the fabric as shown in the first photo on the left; you will trim the lining after you sew it onto the leotard or swimsuit.

 

  • Sew along the existing machine-made seams of the leotard or swimsuit, but make sure that the stitches are at least 3 mm (1/8″) away from the outer edges of the seam.  (Note: The second photo on the left was taken after the lining was trimmed to show the gap that should be at least 3 mm (1/8″).)
 how to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit 4. To sew the lining onto the garment, use the Catch Stitch, with a knot in every fourth stitch to make the seam stretchy! 

Here is how:

In the drawing, the garment is shown in pink, the patterned band is the existing machine-made seam of the garment and the green is the lining layer on top.  (I made the lining partially transparent in the image so that you can see where to sew.)

Starting at one end of the section your wish to line, for example the crotch of the leotard or swimsuit, make 4 zig zag stitches: A-B, C-D, E-F and G-H.

(Here is a link to the page on sewing Lycra blends where I learned about making a knot in every fourth stitch.)

How to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit 5.  Now stretch the fabric of the stitched area so that the thread in the stitches becomes a bit loose. 
 how to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit 6. Without making the loosened stitches taut again, make a knot very close to the fabric on the lining side, as shown in red in the drawing.


How to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit 7.  Repeating steps 4 through 6, continue to work your way up along the outline of the garment by section.  For example, sew both sides of the torso, then the arm holes, the top of the straps, and finally the neck line.  (Sewing by section on both sides of the garment will help to keep the lining nicely aligned with the garment.)
How to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit

How to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit

8. When you have finished sewing the entire outline of the section of the leotard or swimsuit you wish to line, cut the lining fabric along the hand-stitches.

You need to cut very close to the hand-stitches, but be careful not to cut the stitches or the garment fabric!  Trim enough so that its edges of the lining remain hidden on the inside of the leotard or swimsuit.

 How to add a lining to a leotard or swimsuit 10.  When you flip the leotard/swimsuit right side out, the newly attached lining, as well as your stitches, should remain hidden from view!

Now you are ready to go swimming or dancing without feeling uncomfortable about what you are wearing!

Happy crafty hand-sewing!

How to Make a Sock Puppet that Really Swallows Food

How to make a sock puppet that really eats!

 

A sock puppet that really swallows food is a puppet that can ‘eat’ whatever you put into its mouth!  This is because the puppet’s mouth is connected to its tummy.  There are a lot of tutorials available online to learn how to make sock puppets, but I have not found any puppets with a mouth that is connected to their tummy.  (Here is a link to a helpful tutorial for making sock puppets with a mouth that opens and closes,  although they cannot swallow food like the puppets described in this post.)  So, here it is!

This tutorial was inspired by the pig puppet in the photo above, which my daughter made as part of a volunteer activity for older students to spend time with younger students in her school. 

The following instructions are for making the wolf sock puppet, also shown in the above photo.  The wolf puppet’s mouth, which is the heel of the sock, is directly connected to its tummy, which is the toe of the sock.  So, when an object is put into the wolf’s mouth, it goes into its tummy!

If you wish to make a wolf puppet and would like to use the same patterns for its ears, nose and tail as mine, you can download them from Free_Wolf_Sock_Puppet_Pattern-Letter-Muumade (US Letter size) or Free_Wolf_Sock_Puppet_Pattern-A4-Muumade (A4 size).  But, you do not have to necessarily make a wolf.  In fact you can make all kinds of animals in a similar manner; simply change its ears, nose and tail to whatever shapes appropriate for the animal that you want to make.

What you will need:

  • 1 microfiber fuzzy sock (also described as chenille or cozy)*
  • 2 googly eyes, approximately 2 cm (3/4″) in diameter
  • 1 felt or foam sheet for the ears and tail**
  • 1 felt or foam sheet for the nose, in a different color from that used for the ears and tail**
  • (optional) 1 felt or foam sheet for the tongue, in red**
  • Craft glue
  • 1 needle with thread or a stapler to attach the ears, nose and tail onto the sock puppet.***

*If you want your puppet to have big teeth like the ones I made for the wolf sock puppet in the above photo, I recommend that you select a sock that has a light colored heel as it becomes the roof of the puppet’s mouth.

**If you are sewing, I recommend that you use felt instead of foam.

***As you can see in the photo above, my daughter stapled the pig’s nose and ears onto the sock because it is much quicker than sewing or gluing. 

How to make a sock puppet that really eats!How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 1. Start to turn the sock inside out (folding outwards) and stop once the fold reaches the heel.
How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 2. (Optional) If you do not want for your sock puppet to have big teeth like the ones I made for the wolf puppet, please skip to Step 4.

Prepare a needle with sewing thread in a color that matches the heel of the sock.  Insert the needle into the center of the heel of the sock about 1 cm (??) from the edge, and make several tight loops in the same spot, scrunching the fabric there, as shown in the photo on the left.  (For a close-up image, please refer to the photo in the next step.)

How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 3. Repeat twice more, making one loop about 2 cm (??) away from the first on each side.  These 3 loops of thread then create 4 giant teeth.
How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 4. Cut out 1 nose and 2 ears from felt or foam.
 
How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 5. Glue on the googly eyes and nose.  Let the glue dry.
How to make a sock puppet that really eats!How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 6. Attach the ears onto the top of the puppet’s head. 

As you see in the photos on the left, I recommend bending the bases of the ears slightly forward when attaching them, so that they stand up.

You can sew, glue or staple the ears onto the sock puppet. 

How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 7. Cut out the tail from felt or foam.
How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 8. Attach the tail onto the toe area of the sock, as shown in the left photo.  (I also added a yellow button as an accent.)  Again, you may sew, glue or staple it on.
How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 9. (Optional) Cut out the tongue from red felt or foam.
How to make a sock puppet that really eats!How to make a sock puppet that really eats! 10. Glue the tongue onto the bottom of the inside of the puppet’s mouth. 

I suggest you position the tongue so that its tip sticks out of the mouth a little bit as shown in the second photo on the left.

How to make a sock puppet that really eats!“Grrrrrrr.  I’m hungry.  Give me something good or I’ll eat you up!”

How to make a sock puppet that really eats“A pie! Yummy…”  (Interested in making needle felted food for your sock puppet? Here is a post on DIY needle felted food.)

How to make a sock puppet that really eats!Happy puppet making!

How to Make String Art: Some Do’s and Don’ts

How to make String Art - To do's and not to do's DREAM Muumade

 

String art is a great way to create decorative wall hangings.  With only nails and string, you can transform a few shapes or letters into art in whatever colors and sizes you wish! 

Making string art can also be a fun family project.  Above is the string art project that we made with our daughter for her room.  She is very happy with it because she was able to pick every element, from its design to its color scheme.  But more importantly, she is proud of the work that she put into making her DREAM come true, so to speak!  (By the way, the flying pig in the photo above is a courageous pig that dared to dream of flying and managed to make the impossible possible by using its wits to create wings.  Its patterns and instructions on how to make it are available from my online shop, muumade.etsy.com)

Here is a list of what you will need to make your own string art:

  • A board
  • Nails
  • A hammer
  • Crochet string (We used Size 3 cotton string)
  • Super glue

But before you start gathering the above-mentioned materials, here are a few “do’s” and “don’ts” based on our experience so that you can make a shortcut to success without having to commit the same mistakes that we made!

How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do'sBoard

To make the DREAM string art shown in the first photo, we used a 1.5 cm (5/8″) thick particle board with a white melamine coating.  It is 55 cm (21 1/2″) wide and 45 cm (17 1/2″) long.  

Do: Use wood – solid, plywood or particle board, because it offers a hard surface on which to secure the nails in place.  Choose a board that is thick enough to allow about 1.25 cm (1/2″) of the nails to be hammered into it without their coming out on the other side.  I recommend a thickness of around 2 cm (3/4″).

Don’t: Avoid panels with a melamine coating!  As shown in the photo above, this type of finish cracks very easily when a nail is hammered in and leaves gagged edges around the hole.  If you want the surface to be in a color other than that of natural wood, I suggest that you paint the board. 

How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do'sType of Fonts or Images

We used the Stencil font for the letters DREAM.  While the resulting letters look pretty, this font made our project more complicated than we had expected.  We needed to put the nails rather close together in order for the thin pointy tips and rounded ends of these letters to show.  We placed them 5 mm (3/16″) apart, and that meant we used approximately 800 nails!  Hammering in nails in a straight line is a challenge, but doing so that close together made the task painstakingly tedious.

Do: I suggest that you keep your image or word as simple as possible.  If you are using letters, simpler fonts with an even thickness and fewer protruding points, such as Arial, would be good.  Also, to make it easier to hammer the nails, you may want to space out the letters more than we did (we only had 5 mm (3/16″) between the A and the M, for example).

Don’t: I think that the above description of our experience pretty much sums it up; avoid fancy fonts or complicated images with detailed and protruding parts!

How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do'sNails

We used 25 mm (1″) long brass nails with a wide head.

Do: I liked the nails that we used, because their wide head made it easy for the string to be held onto each nail.  The length of the nail was also good.

Don’t: I definitely do not recommend placing nails as close together as we did, i.e. 5 mm (3/16″) apart.  I’d say an interval of around 1.5 cm (1/2″) between the nails would be a lot more practical.  Trying to hammer them in so close together, we sacrificed a good number of the nails.

Now that you know ‘what to do’ and ‘what not to do’, you are ready to make your own string art!

How to make string art

 How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do's 1. Prepare a word or image that you wish to use for your string art, in a size appropriate for the board that you have selected.  (Here is a link with beautiful examples of string art to get your imagination going.)
 How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do's 2. Make marks to position nails along the outlines of your image or word at equal intervals.  I recommend 1.5 cm (1/2″) intervals.
 How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do's 3. Place that paper template on top of the board, and when you are happy with its placement, temporarily tape it onto the board.  (Note: Make sure that the tape that you are using does not peel off the paint or coating of the board when removed.)
 How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do's 4. Hammer the nails into the board along the outlines of your word/image.  (Note:  This step can take a long time, depending on the complexity of your design and the distance you use between the nails.)
 How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do's 5. Once you have finished hammering in the nails, remove the paper template.
 How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do's 6. Make a small loop at one end of the string and apply a bit of Super glue on the knot.  Then, hook the loop onto one of the nails.
 How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do's 7. Now start weaving the string back and forth around the nails, while keeping it taut.  My daughter enjoyed this part of the project immensely.  She did the stringing randomly, although she made sure to catch every nail once in the process.
 How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do's 8. When finished stringing a letter or a shape, make two overhand knots around the last nail.  Then apply a bit of Super glue on the knot.  When the glue is dry, cut off the string. 

 

Ta-da!

How to make String Art: To do's and Not to do'sI hope that you are happy with how your string art turned out!  

If you would like to share an image of your work, you are more than welcome to do so in my blog’s gallery. 

Happy handcrafting!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Making Seat Cushion Covers to Reupholster an Old Couch

How to Reupholster Seat Cushion Covers to Reupholster a Couch

 

Reupholstering a couch does not have to be overwhelming.  An important trick to tackle this big job is to consider the different parts of the couch separately: seat cushions, arm rests, back supports, etc.  Then, focus only on the areas that need repair.

We wore through the covers of the seat cushions of our beloved couch after many years of daily use.  It really started to look shabby.  But, it was still a very comfortable sofa.  We thought that it was not worth having the whole couch reupholstered professionally, but we definitely did not want to give up on our old sofa! 

So I decided to give reupholstering a try.  As you can see in the photo above, I only replaced the two covers of the seat cushions, to keep this large-scale sewing task to a minimum.

 How to Reupholster Seat Cushion Covers to Reupholster a Couch 1. First, I un-stitched the top part of one of the seat cushion covers with a seam ripper.  (Note: If your sofa has multiple seat cushions, leave one intact for now.  You can use that old cover as a reference while you work on the others.)  When I separated the top from the bottom of the cushion cover, I was surprised to discover that the top was a very simple rectangle!  I kept the bottom portion (the black part with a zipper in the photo) intact because it did not need replacing; this decision helped to keep the project simple and quick. 
 How to Reupholster Seat Cushion Covers to Reupholster a Couch 2. Next I cut out new fabric in the same size and shape as the old top.

Then before sewing the new fabric onto the bottom portion of the cover, I carefully studied how the old cushion cover was sewn together.  (This was when having left that old cover intact was very useful!)

 How to Reupholster Seat Cushion Covers to Reupholster a Couch 3. I used a sewing machine with upholstery thread to sew the cover back together.  This thread is thicker and stronger than regular sewing thread.  You also need to use a needle that is suitable for the thickness of the thread. 

Before sewing the cushion covers, it is very important to test and adjust the thread tension on your sewing machine with layers of scrap fabric similar in thickness to the new cover.

We are quite happy with the outcome of my reupholstering project.  Our sofa may still be old, but it is also very comfortable (a number one priority for any couch!) and now has a new look, which was honored by the approval of the Comfy Frog Price.

How to Reupholster Seat Cushion Covers to Reupholster a Couch

I would like to end this post with a quote from Murakami’s novel Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, “you can tell a lot about a person’s character from his choice of sofa.” 

So, if you have a good sofa, mend it and keep it for your character’s sake!

Happy reupholstering!

 

How to Cut Out Detailed Designs from Felt

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies

 

Cutting out detailed designs from felt is not easy.  But with a few simple tricks, this daunting task becomes quite doable.

I made the Grease-inspired Pink Ladies applique shown above by cutting out the black letters from felt. These instructions describe the process I used, and the same tricks can be used to cut out any design from felt.

How to cut out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink LadiesIf you like the Pink Ladies applique that I made, you can download the template from this link: Pink_Ladies-Muumade-Free-Template.  (Note: I ask that this file be used only for personal projects).  Or, here is a link for another free Pink Ladies template.

How to cut out detailed designs from felt

Materials:

  • Template (a paper pattern of the letters or designs you wish to cut out from felt)
  • Freezer paper
  • Sharp scissors with pointy tips
  • Pencil
  • Iron
  • Felt for the letters or designs
  • Craft glue (or fabric glue, if you wish to wash later)
  • Transparent adhesive tape
  • Felt or fabric onto which to glue on the design

(In the following, you can click on the images to zoom in for more detail.)

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 1. Print out the pattern that you wish to cut out from felt.  Place a piece of freezer paper on top of the pattern, rough side up, and trace the pattern onto the freezer paper with a pencil.
Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 2. Draw in sections on the freezer paper to temporarily connect the disconnected parts of the pattern (as highlighted in green in the photo). 

Cut the freezer paper around the pattern, leaving a 1 cm (3/8″) margin.

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 3. Place the freezer paper on top of the felt from which you wish to cut out the pattern.  Firmly press an iron (on medium heat) onto the freezer paper for 15 seconds or so.  If the pattern is large, repeat until the entire pattern is attached to the felt.

(Note:  In the following steps, if the freezer paper starts to become detached from the felt, I recommend that you iron it again.)

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 4. Roughly cut out the outline of the pattern, leaving complicated areas uncut. 
Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 5. Now cut out the indentations around the edge of the pattern, like for example the parts of the photo highlighted in blue.  I recommend cutting from one side of each indentation until reaching the deepest part and then starting again to cut from the other side. 

For more intricate areas, such as the “P”, refer to the next step.

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 6. Some of the most complicated parts of the outline of the pattern will require multiple steps to cut them out. 

For example for the “P,” first cut out the blue area, and then the yellow.  (As in the last step, always cut towards the deepest parts of the pattern from each side.)

Continue until you have cut out the entire outline of the pattern.

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 7. It is now time to cut out the large inner sections of your design.  Start by making a small cut in one of the inner sections, such as the area highlighted in blue.  When done cutting out the blue area, you can then cut out the detailed areas highlighted in yellow.

Continue until you have cut out all of the large inner sections of your pattern.

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 8. Lastly, cut out the small inner sections.  In this example, I was able to cut out all of those areas by cutting into them from one edge, as shown by the green lines in the photo.

If you now have sections of your design which need to be held in place, such as the green lines in the photo, use tape to hold them together.

Now you have almost completely cut out the pattern.

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 9. Place tape over the ends of all of the temporary connectors that you made in Step 2.  Cut out the connectors (along the green lines in the photo), remove the felt from the freezer paper, and then re-tape the freezer paper back into place using the edges of the tape as a guide.

The goal here is to cut out the entire pattern from the felt while at the same time holding the disconnected pieces together!

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 10. Cut the template in half.  Place both halves of the template on top of the surface where you want to attach the pattern.
Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 11. Carefully align the felt pattern on top of the paper template. 
Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 12. While holding the felt pattern in place, carefully remove one half of the paper template. 
Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 13. If your design has letters, place a straight edge along the bottom of the letters, as shown in the photo.  This will help to maintain the base line of the text while gluing the letters in place. 

Working only on the side of the pattern without the template, apply glue to the back of your pattern.  Start from the center and work your way to the edge.  In this case, I started with the “d”, then moved on to the “a” and finished with the “L”. 

(Note:  If you plan to wash the item you are making, use fabric glue.  Otherwise, you can use regular craft glue.)

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 14. Once the first half of the template is glued, carefully remove the second half of the paper template and glue the rest of the pattern in a similar manner.
Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies 15. After letting the glue dry, carefully remove the freezer paper from the felt. 

Cutting out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies

Congratulations!  You now have an impressive looking felt applique.

How to cut out detailed designs from felt - Grease Pink Ladies

As shown above, I used the Whip Stitch to sew the applique onto a jacket (so that I could remove it later).  However, if you wish to permanently attach the pattern, you can glue it onto the garment.

So now, who would dare say “she is too pure to be pink”? 😉

(The answer: Rizzo from the musical Grease.)

New Arrival: The Simply Simple Sheep

Simply Simple Sheep Sewing Pattern

 

A family of fluffy sheep has just joined the Muumade clan!

The Simply Simple Sheep sewing pattern & tutorial is now available from my online shop, Muumade.etsy.com.

For more images of these woolly creatures (including a stop motion video of the Simply Simple Mother Sheep being philosophical), please visit my blog page.

Muu

Writing and Drawing on Felt

Writing and Drawing on Felt

 

Writing and drawing on felt might seem a bit tricky because of its fuzzy surface.  But, it is actually not hard at all when you use permanent markers or fabric markers!  I used the former (Sharpies) for this post, but I’ve read that fabric markers also work well, and they seem to be better if you will want to wash the articles that you write or draw on. 

A few things to remember when using permanent markers on felt:

Writing and Drawing on Felt1. Draw/write without pausing.  When the tip of a marker stays in one spot too long, the ink spreads and also bleeds through to the other side of the felt (possibly marking your work surface).

 

 

 

Writing and Drawing on Felt2. DO NOT touch the ink right after applying it onto the felt; it will not dry immediately.  After a few minutes, however, it should be completely dry.

 

 

 

Writing and Drawing on Felt3. When different colors touch one another in a design, let the ink of one color dry completely before applying the next color to avoid unwanted mixing of the colors. 

Because the blue petals of the flower on the left were drawn immediately after the yellow center, the two colors got mixed.  The flower on the right, on the other hand, has a clean yellow center because I waited a few minutes to add the petals after making the yellow circle.

(Note: The orange and white pieces of felt in the above photos are a wool and synthetic blend, whereas the pink is 100% wool.  As you can see, the Sharpie markers worked equally well on both types of felt.)

Writing and Drawing on Felt

I was a little nervous about drawing patch marks onto the white Simply Simple Dog that I recently made.  But in the end, I was very happy with how I transformed it into a lovely Dalmatian in a matter of minutes!

Writing and Drawing on FeltThat said, I do NOT recommend using permanent markers to temporarily mark felt for sewing or cutting.

For sewing, I mark felt with a tracing pencil, which rubs off quite easily (See the photo of the shell of the Tardy Tortoise finger puppet on the right).  If drawing on the reverse side of the felt, you can also use a regular pencil.  Here are a few more suggestions. 

 

Writing and Drawing on FeltFor cutting out felt pieces, you don’t even have to draw their outlines onto the felt.  Instead, I recommend using freezer paper.  Trace the patterns onto the matt side of the freezer paper, iron it onto the felt, and cut out the patterns without having to mark the felt!

 

 

Happy crafting!

Fixing a Cardigan with Rips around Snap Fasteners

Fixing a Cardigan with Rips around Snap Fasteners

 

Repairing a cardigan or any knitwear with rips around snap fasteners may seem daunting, but here is an easy solution to this problem – remove the snaps!

Snap fasteners (sometimes also called press studs) are convenient interlocking disks that snap together.  But because they pull the fabric or knitwear around them whenever they are separated, snap fasteners can cause rips.  That is precisely what happened to my thin black cardigan.

One option for fixing the rips around snap fasteners in knitwear is to replace them with new studs.  But this requires quite a bit of work:  First, you have to drill a hole in each stud until the two parts of the fastener come apart.  And then you need to mend the ripped areas either by darning, patching or needle felting before you can attach new snap fasteners.  Unfortunately, thin knitwear is rather vulnerable to tearing to begin with, so replacing the snap fasteners may not be a long term fix.

Instead, I opted to remove the snap fasteners.  Here is how I transformed my old cardigan with tears into a dressier garment with a laced front!

Materials and tools I used:

  • Seam ripper
  • Felting needle
  • Needle felting brush/sponge
  • Wool roving in a color similar to the knit garment
  • Lace, the length of the two cardigan fronts
  • Sewing machine
Fixing a Cardigan with Rips around Snap Fasteners 1. First, I removed the old snap fasteners by cutting the material around them with a seam ripper
Fixing a Cardigan with Rips around Snap Fasteners Here is one of the holes I made in removing the snap fasteners.
Fixing a Cardigan with Rips around Snap Fasteners 2. Next, I needle felted wool roving to fill in the holes. 

Needle felt the roving thoroughly until the filled-in areas are nearly as thick as the cardigan.

Fixing a Cardigan with Rips around Snap Fasteners This is how a filled-in area looks when finished.
Fixing a Cardigan with Rips around Snap Fasteners

 

3. Lastly, I sewed a strip of lace onto the edge of each front of the cardigan. 

I set my sewing machine to the zigzag setting with a stitch width of 5 and a stitch length of 1 (24spi).  Note, the stitch width depends on the width of the area in your lace where you can sew.  As shown in the photo, my lace had a solid band along one edge that is slightly wider than 5 mm (3/16″).  That is why I used a stitch width of 5.

If your lace has two straight edges, I recommend that you sew along both of them.

Here is my newly transformed cardigan!

Fixing a Cardigan with Rips around Snap Fasteners

Flat needle felting - color flowers on an upcycled sweaterAnother way to fix old knitwear is to needle felt designs onto it, as I did with the brown cardigan in the photo on the left.  (Click on the photo for more information.) 

 

 

 

Happy mending!